On-Line Desert Committee Meeting October 29

This will be the second of a series of single-topic, on-line meetings. They will be one hour in length (maximum) with a presentation on a single topic. There will be an opportunity for viewers to ask questions or comment in the last fifteen minutes. Date: Thursday, October 29, 2020 Time: 7:30 – 8:30 PM Topic: […]

September 2020 – Latest Issue

Special Issue: A Voice For Our Public Lands From the Editors: Past, Present, and Future of America’s Public LandsNational Parks: Past Progress, New ChallengesAn Indigenous PerspectiveAn Evolving Idea: Perils and Promise of the Federal Landscape Muddy River: Unsustainable Groundwater Extraction in Southern NVA Border Wall in the Jacumba Wilderness AreaBLM’s Proposals for the Great Basin […]

A BORDER WALL IN THE JACUMBA WILDERNESS AREA

            Three Months of Construction, August 9, 2020 by Craig Deutsche. Two and a half months of construction in the Jacumba Wilderness have produced several miles of a border wall, extensive environmental damage, a thicket of procedural and legal questions, and very few answers. Because vehicular traffic is prohibited in congressionally designated Wilderness, the area […]

NATIONAL PARKS: PAST PROGRESS, NEW CHALLENGES

The 40th Anniversary of the State of the Parks Report by Jon Jarvis, National Parks Director 2009−2017 Forty years ago, in May of 1980, the National Park Service (NPS) released a report to Congress that, for the first time, quantified the threats to the 326 units of the National Park System. The findings identified significant […]

PUBLIC LAND: an INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVE

by Phil Bellfy, PhD Land as Sacred In the language of my people, the Ojibway of the Upper Great Lakes, the word “aki” refers to the land, the earth, the “dirt” of this planet, if you will. The city of Milwaukee derives its name from this word; Mino-aki, the “Pleasant Ground,” which has been Anglo-Saxonized […]

AN EVOLVING IDEA

The Perils and Promise of the Federal Landscape by Adam M. Sowards Many commentators view the United States and its Constitution as an experiment in democracy. And as an experiment, the nation remains forever unfinished, because democracy’s terms change when novel ideas arise, when results of the trial fall short or turn out different from […]

HIGH NOON ON THE MUDDY RIVER

Unsustainable Groundwater Extraction in Southern Nevada  by Patrick Donnelly The remote basins of the northern Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin are quite arid, but they also harbor remarkable aquatic biological diversity at isolated springs – oases in one of the driest places on earth. These springs, marshes, wetlands, creeks, and other surface water features […]

URBAN WILDERNESS COLLISION

            A Highway through Utah’s Red Cliffs National Conservation Area by Tom Butine, Board President, Conserve Southwest Utah Due to its climate and outdoor environment, the county has become a retirement, tourism, and recreation destination. It has experienced almost a four-fold increase of population over the last 30 years (to 183,000), and is projected to […]

SALTON SEA REPORT

It’s Still There, with Many Challenges by Gary Gray Our neighbor to the east, the Salton Sea, is still stunningly gorgeous but continues, on a daily basis, to become a greater health hazard and wildlife habitat loss . This giant inland body of water provides an essential migratory stopover for hundreds of bird species migrating […]

A CALIFORNIA DESERTS CONSERVANCY

Public support for a public resource By Susy Boyd and Geary Hund | Despite making up nearly one quarter of California and representing one of the largest intact ecosystems left in the lower forty-eight states, California’s 25 million acres of desert lands receive very little state funding for conservation projects. By contrast, other California regions […]