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NO PLACE TO HIDE

Living and dying in the desert BY ROBIN FLINCHUM : THE LAST TIME WE SAW our friend Jim he was riding off into the horizon, that delicate line where the never-ending blue sky meets the muted colors of the panoptic desert. In my memory now, he simply fades into a poof of bone colored dust […]

AN INTERVIEW WITH TERRY TEMPEST WILLIAMS

An environmentalist who writes from the heart :TERRY WAS BORN in 1955 in California into a family of Mormon faith. When she was two years of age, the family moved to Salt Lake City area where she spent most of her growing-up years. It was there that she experienced first-hand the unforeseen impact when the […]

America’s Federal Lands:

            The Significance of Administrative Rulemaking by David Rutherford, Associate Professor, University of Mississippi The plan is to get rid of public lands altogether, turning them over to the states, which can be coerced as the federal government cannot be, and eventually to private ownership. . . Nothing in history suggests that the states are […]

INCREASED VISITATION TO PUBLIC LANDS

BY BIRGITTA JANSEN A SIGNIFICANT INCREASE in visitation to public lands has become a major issue for the managers of these lands and for the land itself. There are many factors that have contributed to the use and in some places, overuse of public lands. Current trends are continuing to intensify. A closer look at […]

A BORDER WALL IN THE JACUMBA WILDERNESS AREA

            Three Months of Construction, August 9, 2020 by Craig Deutsche. Two and a half months of construction in the Jacumba Wilderness have produced several miles of a border wall, extensive environmental damage, a thicket of procedural and legal questions, and very few answers. Because vehicular traffic is prohibited in congressionally designated Wilderness, the area […]

NATIONAL PARKS: PAST PROGRESS, NEW CHALLENGES

The 40th Anniversary of the State of the Parks Report by Jon Jarvis, National Parks Director 2009−2017 Forty years ago, in May of 1980, the National Park Service (NPS) released a report to Congress that, for the first time, quantified the threats to the 326 units of the National Park System. The findings identified significant […]

PUBLIC LAND: an INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVE

by Phil Bellfy, PhD Land as Sacred In the language of my people, the Ojibway of the Upper Great Lakes, the word “aki” refers to the land, the earth, the “dirt” of this planet, if you will. The city of Milwaukee derives its name from this word; Mino-aki, the “Pleasant Ground,” which has been Anglo-Saxonized […]

AN EVOLVING IDEA

The Perils and Promise of the Federal Landscape by Adam M. Sowards Many commentators view the United States and its Constitution as an experiment in democracy. And as an experiment, the nation remains forever unfinished, because democracy’s terms change when novel ideas arise, when results of the trial fall short or turn out different from […]

HIGH NOON ON THE MUDDY RIVER

Unsustainable Groundwater Extraction in Southern Nevada  by Patrick Donnelly The remote basins of the northern Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin are quite arid, but they also harbor remarkable aquatic biological diversity at isolated springs – oases in one of the driest places on earth. These springs, marshes, wetlands, creeks, and other surface water features […]